What is Kumanthong

What is Kumanthong

Kumanthong 古曼童

Kumanthong 古曼童

OriKuman, or Kumara (Pali) means “young boy” (young girl would be “Kumaree”), Tong means golden.

Kuman Tong (alternatively spelled “Kuman Tong”), is not a Buddhist practice, rather pure “Saiyasart” (Occultism, in this case, Necromancy). It would also be accurate to class the practice of keeping Kuman Tong as an essentially Animist practice. The genuine Kuman Tong which was revered and created in Ancient times according to traditional method, by Adept practitioners of Saiyasart, was made by surgically removing the unborn fetus of a child from the womb of its Mother. The body of the child would then be taken to a cemetery for the conduction of the Ceremony to invoke a Kuman Tong. The body is roasted until dry whilst the Mage chants incantations of Magical Kata. In the case of making a female spirit child, the effigy is not called Kuman Tong, rather “Hong Pray”.

Some Kuman effigies will be soaked in Nam Man Prai, which has extract of a dead child or a person who died in violent circumstances or an unnatural death. This is much less common now, due to the fact that this practice is now illegal if using fat from human babies for the consecrating oil. There are however still some authentically made amulets appearing. Some years ago a famous monk was thrown out of the Buddhist Sangha for roasting a baby. He was convicted, but later continued to make magic as a layperson after his release. The practice of creating Necromantic effigies of a Kuman Tong comes from age old tradition in Siam. Thai folk have made Bucha to Animistic spirits and ghosts since time immemorial. The original Kuman Tong came from children who died whilst still in their mothers womb. The Magic makers would take these stillborn babies and adopt them as their children. From what information has been gathered from ancient Thai manuscripts about how to make a Kuman Tong, it appears that the correct method is to remove the dead baby surgically from the mothers womb, and take it to undergo the proper ceremonial ritual; The baby must be roasted until dry. This must be completed before dawn, and should be performed in a cemetery. Once the rite is completed, the dry roasted Kuman should be painted with Ya Lak (a kind of lacquer used to cover amulets and Tagrud with gold leaf), and covered in gold leaf. This is the real reason why this effigy received the name of “Kuman Tong” (which means “Golden Baby Boy”).Kuman Tong in Modern times.

As society developed and became “Civilized”, the practice of roasting dead babies became legally impossible to do, and so an adaptation of the making method was developed. One of the ways was to make a clay effigy using the earth from seven cemeteries, Mai Rak Soorn wood, or Mai Mayom wood was also used for making Kuman Tong statues. Even iron is now used for the making of Kuman Tong effigies. To invoke the magical power, the effigy is implanted with Kata to bring the Kuman to life.

Kumanthong 古曼童

Kumanthong 古曼童

This is done by using Kata Taat See (invoking four elements), and Kata Agarn Sam Sip Sorng (32 parts of the Human body). It is believed, that this will cause the mind and spirit of a dead boy to arise within the effigy. Modern Kuman effigies normally have curly hair, whereas the older style ones are bald, a should be the case with an unborn baby. The traditional methods state that a Kuman must be treated like your own child. He must be offered food and drink, and even be called to come and eat every single time you are about to have the meal. It is believed that if the Kuman is handled properly according to the correct ceremonies, he will then protect the house and its inhabitants from danger, and increase good business too.

Please click here to see the History of Kumanthong.

Original Content: http://www.thailand-amulets.net/pra-kata-mantras-for-chanting/kata-and-bucha-method-kuman-tong/

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